Odd city.
Łódź between 1821-1939

For my master's degree project I wrote and designed a book about my home town Łódź and its history between 1821 and 1939. During this period the city was inhabited by four nations: Poles, Germans, Russians and Jews. 
 
After 1821 the small town quickly became a modern industrial centre. A constant influx of workers, businessmen and craftsmen from all over Europe transformed Łódź into the main textile production centre, that was now considered a 'promised land'.
 
The books consists of four parts, attached together and translated into four languages, each part inspired by one of the nations and its role in the development of the city. Its unique structure is a metaphore of the complicated relationships between the nations, that had to coexist in the city of Łódź at the time. Additionaly, the book is illustrated by prints of archive leaflets, posters, letters and newspapers, that take the reader on a journey to the past.
 
Nowadays, in the city of Łódź, it is almost impossible to find any obvious signs of its rich and complicated history, that ended tragically in the 1939. There are no loger any russian signboards, german newspapers or jewish synagogues. Therefore the book is a guide, or a diary, about Łódź's unique history.

ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS IN WARSAW, MA Book Design
PROFESSOR Maciej Buszewicz

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CHAPTER I

Polish inhabitants of Łódź were mainly peasants, that came to the city searching for work and better life. Therefore this part is inspired by folk embroidery from regions around Łódź. 

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CHAPTER II

Germans were the most powerful group of inhabitants. Skilled weavers that came to Łódź from Southern Germany, quickly became rich factory owners that ruled the city.

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CHAPTER III

Until 1918 Poland was part of Russian Empire. Russians in Łódź were mainly soldiers or officials on duty, for whom Łódź was only a place of temporary exile.

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CHAPTER IV

Design of jewish part is refering to the jewish quarter, initially situated north of the town square, its growth, development and the tragic ending: ghetto during World War II.

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FIDLERÓWNA
Graphic Design | Illustration | Art Direction

Based in Berlin
fidlerowna@gmail.com